Participants

Segun Afolabi

  • Faculty of Administration, Laval University
  • Abstract Title: Translation, Education and Publication: The African Perspective

Bio: Segun Afolabi bagged a PhD in Translation Studies at Laval University, Canada, where he currently works as Research Fellow/Translator. He also serves as the Project Manager of CREDIT (Centre for Research & Development in Interpretation & Translation) whose mandate is to promote the professionalization and institutionalization of the twin disciplines in Nigeria, Africa and beyond. Dr. Afolabi's research interests cut across translation pedagogy, history of translation, sociology of translation, and translation for development. He has published on these subjects in reputable journals including The Interpreter and Translator & Trainer, Transletters and Meta. His latest book, La traduction et l'interprétation au Nigéria was published in 2020 by L'Harmattan in Paris. He is Co-editor of Tafsiri, a panafrican journal of translation and interpretation published by Le Grenier des savoirs, an organ of scienceafrique.org.


Abstract: For Translation Studies (TS) scholars whose research interest touches the issue of translator training in particular, the trifold relationship between translation, education and publication (TEP) should necessarily be a matter of genuine concern. Conceptually, while we view translation as the entire process of language mediation (oral or written, intra or interlinguistic/semiotic, etc.), education is considered here as the process of training (and retraining) translators, including translator trainers; and publication refers to the process of sharing or disseminating knowledge, particularly, the results of research activities conducted on the last two concepts. In this paper, we will attempt to critically examine the situation with regard to these three concepts (translation, education and publication) globally, and more specifically in the African context. Using the analytical literature review approach, the research questions that we seek to answer are as follows:
- Are translators been adequately trained in Africa?
- What are the available translator training programmes across the continent?
- What is the quantity of contributions on translator training in TS related publications in and/or on Africa?