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Home Core Faculty Meheli Sen

Meheli Sen

Assistant ProfessorMeheli Sen

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Office: 15 Seminary Place Room 6170
College Avenue Campus

Meheli Sen received her Ph.D. from Emory University’s Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts in 2008, with a certificate in Film Studies. Prior to this, she received a B.A. in Comparative Literature in 1997 and an M.A. in Film Studies in 1999 at Jadavpur University in Kolkata, India.

Sen has previously taught at the University of Oklahoma’s Film and Media Studies Program and in the College of Communication at DePaul University.

Sen’s primary research area is post-independence commercial Hindi cinema, commonly referred to as Bollywood.  She is especially interested in questions of gender, genre, postcoloniality, and globalization. She is co-editing an anthology titled Figurations in Indian Film, forthcoming from Palgrave Macmillan. Her current research engages ‘B’ genres, particularly horror, in the larger rubric of the Bollywood system, especially the specific conduits of distribution and reception therein. She is also working on a book manuscript on post-independence Hindi cinema titled Discontented Modernities: Gender, Genre and Nation in Post-Independence Hindi Cinema.

Selected Publications:

“Terrifying Tots and Hapless Homes: Undoing Modernity in Recent Bollywood Cinema,” LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory, Volume 22, Issue 3, 2011, 197-217.

“Vernacular Modernities and Fitful Globalities in Shyam Benegal’s Cinematic Provinces”, Many Cinemas 1, Online: http://www.manycinemas.de/mc01sen.html, 2011, 8-22.

“‘It’s All About Loving Your Parents’: Hindutva, Liberalization and Bollywood’s New Patriarch” in Bollywood and Globalization: Indian Popular Cinema, Nation, and Diaspora ed. by Rini Bhattacharya Mehta and Rajeshwari Pandharipande, London: Anthem Press, 2010, 145-168.

“Obscure Objects/Defiant Subjects: Anglo-Indian Women in Hindi Cinema” South Asian Review, Vol. XXVII, No. 1, 2006, 182-203.

AMESALL courses:

Bollywood

Literature and Cinema of South Asia

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