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Awards:


CHARLES G. HABERL has been awarded the Board of Trustees Research Fellowship for Scholarly Excellence (2012) for his important contribution to the documentation and preservation of Mandaean. This is a competitive award which recognizes distinguished research accomplishments of faculty members who have just been tenured and promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. 

 

SAMAH SELIM has been awarded a Fulbright Fellowship for the academic year 2012-2013 to support her new book-length study of modern literary criticism in Egypt. Earlier this academic year Samah won the University of Arkansas' 2011 Arabic Literature Translation Award, making her the only person to win both the Arkansas award and the Ghobash-Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation.


Samah Selim Wins 2011 ARABIC LITERATURE TRANSLATION AWARD


The University of Arkansas’ Center for Middle East Studies has announced that the “exceptionally talented Samah Selim has won their Arabic Literature Translation award for 2011 for her translation of Jurji Zaidan’s Tree of Pearls” (Shajarat al-Durr). With over twenty popular historical novels to his credit, Jurji Zaidan (1861-1914) was one of the leaders of the 19th century “Arab renaissance,” and founder of Cairo’s al-Hilal, one of the earliest, and most successful, monthly journals in the Arabic-speaking world.  The Arkansas annual award recognizes the best book-length translation of the year of an Arabic literary text in any genre selected by an independent team of judges. In 2009 Selim was the recipient of the Saif Ghobash-Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation for her English translation of a collection by the Egyptian writer, Yahya al-Tahir Abdallah, under the title The Collar and the Bracelet. The latest accomplishment makes “Selim the only person to win both the Banipal and the Arkansas translation awards!” 


Charles Haberl

Ousseina Alidou

Announcements

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, ARABIC LITERATURE

The Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures (AMESALL) at Rutgers University (New Brunswick), invites applications for a tenure-track position at the level of assistant professor in the field of Arabic Literature beginning Fall 2012.

Native or near-native proficiency in Arabic and a PhD. in Arabic Literature, Middle Eastern Literatures or a related field are required. The PhD should be in hand by the beginning of employment. The committee will consider applications in all periods and fields of Arabic literature, and is particularly interested in candidates who specialize in modern Arabic literature with a focus on poetry. The successful candidate will have a record of publications in the field with a demonstrated interest in comparative literary studies. Undergraduate teaching experience in Arabic language and literature as well as the literatures of the broader Middle East in translation, with a cross-disciplinary focus, will be an added advantage. The position will involve designing and teaching courses on Arabic literature - including advanced readings courses taught in Arabic - participating in a team-taught undergraduate course on the literatures of Africa, the Middle East and South Asia, and conducting research in one’s area of academic interest.

AMESALL is one of the newest departments at Rutgers University and seeks to build a dynamic, cutting edge undergraduate program in comparative Afro-Asian literary and cultural studies with a solid foundation in the languages of the three regions. As such, the department encourages innovative scholarship and offers strong opportunities for collaborative and interdisciplinary research.

The completed application, including a CV, three letters of recommendation, and a writing sample no longer than 25 pages should be mailed to:

Dr. Alamin Mazrui
Rutgers University
Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures
54 Joyce Kilmer Avenue
Lucy Stone Hall B 309
Piscataway NJ 08854

Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2011. Rutgers is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer.

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RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY

LECTURER, ARABIC LANGUAGE

The Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (New Brunswick), invites applications for a renewable annual position of Lecturer of Arabic Language, effective September 1, 2012. The ideal candidate will hold at least a Master’s degree in Arabic, Applied Linguistics or another related field, have native or near-native proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), experience in teaching all levels of Arabic (preferably in a North American university), and competence in communicative, learner-centered language pedagogy, creative use of instructional technology, and formal/informal assessment strategies. Duties will include teaching six undergraduate courses per academic year, producing instructional materials, and participating in professional workshops and the revision of the Arabic curriculum. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. The position carries a full package of University benefits in addition to the salary.

A letter of application, updated CV, the names of three referees, together with evidence of teaching ability, including classroom videos, student evaluations, and sample syllabi should be mailed to:

Dr. Maryam Borjian

Chair, Arabic Search Committee

Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

54 Joyce Kilmer Avenue

Lucy Stone Hall B 307

Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8070.

Review of applications will begin on February 15, 2011 and will continue until the position is filled.

Rutgers is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

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RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY

LECTURER, YORUBA LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

The Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (New Brunswick), invites applications for a renewable annual position of Lecturer of Yoruba Language and Literature, effective September 1, 2012. The ideal candidate will hold at least a Master’s degree in Yoruba Language and Literature or a related field, have native or near-native proficiency in Yoruba language, experience in teaching Yoruba language and literature (preferably in a North American university), competence in communicative, learner-centered language pedagogy and the creative use of instructional technology. Duties will include teaching six undergraduate courses per academic year, including a course on readings in Yoruba literature taught in Yoruba, designing courses, producing instructional materials, and participating in professional workshops.  Salary is commensurate with education and experience. The position carries a full package of University benefits in addition to the salary.

A letter of application, updated CV, names of three referees, and evidence of teaching ability, (including student evaluations, sample syllabi, and teaching materials) should be mailed to:

Dr. Maryam Borjian

Chair, Yoruba Search Committee

Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

54 Joyce Kilmer Avenue

Lucy Stone Hall B 307

Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8070.

Review of applications will begin on November 15, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled.

Rutgers is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

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SAMAH SELIM, Assistant Professor, Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures has been awarded the 2009 Saif Ghobash-Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation for her English translation of a collection by the Egyptian writer, Yahya al-Tahir Abdallah. The English title is The Collar and the Bracelet, published by the American University in Cairo Press. The Ghobash-Banipal Prize deals specifically with the imaginative prose genre and the winner is selected by a panel of experts from around the world. Commenting on the translation, Francine Stock, one of the judges states: “This wonderful translation captures a particular style of narrative, written a third of a century ago but entirely modern.” Another judge, Marilyn Booth adds: “Samah Selim has been able to catch the Upper Egyptian and folkloric rhythms – and their utterly unromantic yoking to the everyday grimness and intimacy of modern realities – that Abdullah pioneered in his fiction.”

For the full story go to: http://www.banipal.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=22


HABERL AND COLLEAGUES AWARDED AN NEH GRANT

Rutgers University Assistant Professor Charles G. Haberl of the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures (AMESALL), and Butler University Associate Professor of Religion James McGrath have been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Scholarly Editions grant for a project to translate the Mandaean Book of John from Mandaic into English.  Professor April DeConick of Rice University, well known for her work on Gnostic texts such as the Gospel of Thomas and the Gospel of Judas, will also be involved as a consultant, and the team will be assisted by Steve Caruso, a professional Aramaic translator and recent graduate of the Rutgers School of Communication and Information (SC&I).  The Mandaeans are a Gnostic group, the only one to have survived from the period of Late Antiquity to the present date.  Haberl and his collaborators plan to spend the next two years on the first stage of this project: producing a typed version of the text in the original language, and translating the more than 200 pages of handwritten text.  In addition to previously-published copies of the Mandaic text and manuscripts in libraries, they will also make use of scans of privately owned copies of the Book of John.  Haberl and his colleagues have already identified a few such manuscripts in the possession of Mandaean families in the United States.  (June 17, 2010)


The AMESALL Panel Discussion

http://ur.rutgers.edu/video/rutv/sp/sp-amesall.wmv



Wake Up Rutgers on RU-tv

http://ur.rutgers.edu/video/rutv/wakeup/wakeup-021510.wmv

Contact Us

©2007 Nick Romanenko (Rutgers)Lucy Stone Hall
B Wing
Room B-309
54 Joyce Kilmer Avenue
Piscataway, NJ  08854


P  848-445-0275
mfrishberg@amesall.rutgers.edu